Announcements


This message is only visible to admins.
Problem displaying Facebook posts. Backup cache in use.
Click to show error
Error: Error validating access token: The session has been invalidated because the user changed their password or Facebook has changed the session for security reasons. Type: OAuthException

Main Content

Source Characterization


Using Vapor Pins® sampling device for Source Characterization
The Vapor Pin® sampling device is ideally suited for locating Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) contamination sources beneath the pavement. Our experience is that most sites have sources of contamination that in addition to those associated with underground tanks and degreasing areas. Unsuspected source areas often correspond to former exterior doors that were obscured by later building expansion. Cox-Colvin has located such sources equipped with little more than some Vapor Pin® sampling devices, a hammer drill, and a multi-gas meter.

Cox-Colvin’s approach to VOC source investigation consists of installing Vapor Pin® sampling devices along a grid, allowing the points to equilibrate, and collecting readings with a multi-gas meter. With a team of two people, we’ve installed as many as 90 Vapor Pin® sampling devices in one day and sampled, removed the Vapor Pin® sampling devices, and plugged the holes on the following day.

For source characterization, we normally install brass Vapor Pin® sampling devices in the stick-up configuration on a grid spacing of 20 to 30 feet. We cover the Vapor Pin® sampling devices with traffic cones and allow them to equilibrate for at least an hour. We then collect field readings with a hand-held multi-gas meter capable of measuring VOCs via Photo-Ionization Detector (PID), oxygen (O2), and Lower Explosive Limits (LEL). The PID indicates VOC sources. O2 in soil gas is normally lower than in air, but unusually low levels (<5%), especially with high LEL readings, are characteristic of methane generation (methanogenesis).
Methanogenesis occurs when non-chlorinated solvents or other organic matter degrades at too high a rate for O2 replenishment.

After collecting field readings at all of the sample points, samples are collected from locations with elevated PID readings, and submitted to a laboratory for confirmation. Samples can be collected into evacuated glass vials, Bottle Vacs, Tedlar bags, Summa canisters, sorbent tubes, and potentially other devices. Some containers do not offer low enough reporting levels for vapor intrusion sampling, but low levels are probably not needed for locating contaminant sources. At the conclusion of sampling, remove the Vapor Pin® sampling devices and fill the holes with hydraulic cement or caulk.

Urethane and polyurethane caulks are recommended by radon mitigation guidance for filling holes and cracks, but they contain VOCs that could interfere with subsequent sampling. Hydraulic cement does not contain VOCs, but it sets up quickly, making it potentially difficult to fill borings to total depth.  After removing the silicone sleeve and other plastic parts from the Vapor Pin® sampling devices, decontaminated them for reuse. Cox-Colvin has a number of Vapor Pin® sampling devices that they have used an average of seven or eight times with no breakage or damage.

DOWNLOAD PDF